President - David Belmont
Vice President - Bill Deters
Treasurer - Brian Ernsberger
Secretary - Ron Skaggs

Trustee - Sharon Rose
Trustee - Kane Simpson
Trustee - Chris Wilder

AMENDMENT II
"A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."
December 15th, 1791 

Wenatchee Rifle and Revolver Club Newsletter - February 2020

Annual Membership Meeting

Despite the cold weather and being dumped on with four inches of snow, we had 68 members attend our Annual Membership Meeting on January 18. There were also 12 more who renewed their membership but had to leave early.

Many thanks to Sharon Rose (Board member) who was in charge of refreshments and the ladies who helped her. Thanks also to Bill Deters (Vice President) who was in charge of the Clubhouse cleanup and to the men who helped him. Much appreciated.

Treasurer Brian Ernsberger gave the financial report. He stated that the cost for flood restoration has cost our Club $13,065,43 so far.

We had 366 current members before January 18 renewals. That number has now increased.

Ron Skaggs, Secretary and Chairman of the Maintenance Committee, read a lengthy list of Capital Improvements completed in 2019. More improvements will follow in 2020.

Ron also discussed the considerable damage done to the range due to flooding late last August and then explained the range restoration efforts so far. We have planned to complete the restoration process this spring and summer.

Bill Deters, Vice President and Chairman of the Safety Committee, spoke about the R.S.O. (Range Safety Officer) program. Bill plans on giving two more classes this year. Our Club is now safer than ever before.

We now have an emergency 9-1-1 phone and Wi Fi for member usage.

David Belmont, President and Chairman of the Technology Committee, recently updated our website and calendar. He will try very hard to keep it current.

We had several questions and comments from the floor. Various Board members answered their questions. 

Elections were held with the following results.

  • President - David Belmont
  • Vice President - Bill Deters
  • Treasurer - Brian Ernsberger
  • Secretary - Ron Skaggs
  • Trustee - Sharon Rose
  • Trustee - Kane Simpson
  • Trustee Chris Wilder

We had a great time with our Raffle and several of our members won some great prizes. Mark Adams won the Grand Prize of a $100.00 gift certificate to Sportsman’s Warehouse.

You can find the complete WRRC Annual Membership Meeting Minutes by clicking here.

The Board thanks each and every one of you for attending and making our meeting a great success.

Safety

  • Always treat every firearm as if it is loaded.
  • Keep your finger straight an off of the trigger until your sights are on the target.
  • Never point the muzzle of your firearm at anything that you are not willing to shoot.
  • Know your target and what lies beyond it.

Sticky Glock Mags

Everyone who has shot a Glock has experienced it: You’re shooting a string of fire, the slide locks open
 and you go to perform an emergency reload only to find the magazine stuck in place. It can be quite frustrating. How can you fix it? Clean your gun differently.

Many Glock magazines stick due to solvent or lubricant in the magazine well. To avoid this, clean the polymer frame with a baby bottle brush, dry scrubbing the dirt and debris out. These brushes have a wide but soft bristle that is designed to work well on plastic. You will see the crud come out quickly and easily compared to trying to get a cleaning patch into the nook and crannies.

Once the frame is clean, apply a coat of car wax to both the inside of the magazine well and the exterior of the polymer magazine body. Just like on the body of your car, the wax will dry and become pasty. When it does, take a clean rag and buff both the magazine well and the magazine body. Make sure you get all of the dried wax away from the inside of the magazine release button. Your magazines should now jettison cleanly away on a reload.

Reports : American Rifleman

Innovation of the Year

Hornady A-Tip Match: The A-Tip match is about advancing bullet technology. The tip is precision machined aluminum and longer than polymer tips, which means that the center of gravity has been ideally adjusted to enhance inflight stability. The tip helps the bullet group tighter due to reduced drag variability. In comparison, some polymer-type tips suffer from friction and deformation inflight, whereas Hornady’s aluminum tip does not. To add, the ogive, tip length, bearing surface and boattail are optimized according to caliber.

To verify a bullet’s optimization, Doppler radar was used in determining each caliber’s low drag coefficient (high BC) with respect to a barrel’s twist rate, seating depth and muzzle velocity.

The science isn’t just about the tip. Hornady also considered the A-Tip’s jacket and engineered uniformity and concentricity into each bullet. In fact, the bullets are sequentially packaged like clones off of the press to offer maximum consistency. There is minimal to no handling of each bullet throughout the manufacturing process to ensure a level of consistency between bullets.

Once made, the bullets are packaged with a polishing bag to prepare the bullets for loading. Unlike other component bullets, the A-Tip is never bulked washed. As a reloader, you receive these bullets as they are packaged off of the manufacturing line.

Once made, the bullets are packaged with a polishing bag to prepare the bullets for loading. Unlike other component bullets, the A-Tip is never bulked washed. As a reloader, you receive these bullets as they are packaged off of the manufacturing line.

Guns and Ammo December 2019

.270 Winchester

Always searching for a step up in performance, I couldn’t help but notice that the Alliant Powder Reloader’s Guide (alliantpowder.com) lists some impressive velocities for the .270 Win. firing 150 grain bullets handloaded using Reloader 26, Nosler Partitions, Sierra GameKings and Speer BTSP 150 grain bullets managing slightly more than 3,000 f.p.s.

Since only maximum propellant weights are provided, start reloading at least 5% below the listed numbers. From the 24” barrel of a Mossberg Revere, Nosler 150 gr. Partitions reached 3042 f.p.s. The guide lists 60.8 grains as maximum, but the 60.5 grain load was too hot for another .270, resulting in flattened primers and stiff bolt lift. 

Reloader 26 is manufactured with Extruded Impregnated (EI) technology that produces several advantages over other propellants. One is “extremely high velocities in magnum cartridges.” While the .270 does not wear a magnum label, Reloader 26 fired 150 grain Partitions a good 100 fps faster than other propellants I’ve tried over the years. EI technology also produces consistent velocities despite temperature extremes. Reloader 26 loads resulted in velocity spreads of 18 fps with nine Partitions. The Mossberg .270 fired three shot groups at 100 yards that measured 0.39” to 1.50”, with 1.10” average groups for five groups. 

Reloader 26’s cylindrical kernals do fail to meter precise weights from a measure; however, dispensing it a few grains below intended weight and dribbling in the last few kernals with a trickler is faster than reading this final sentence.

John Haviland, Field Editor


American Rifleman

From the WRRC Editor

You might be a Redneck if you’re still keeping a goldfish in the plastic bag you won it in. 

Ron Skaggs
WRRC Secretary and Editor.